RSS Feed

23 Months Post Op

13417660_1178165588900200_1704787133049123835_n

Address the Maui Pride remembrance for Orlando

Wow, a lot has happened since my last post and the continuing grief and loss I have over losing my Keahola (beloved) Lisa.  I haven’t written about my transition for such a long time, mostly because Lisa’s passing has completely overwhelmed everything else in my life.  Perhaps that is good, as it seems a lot of the worry I had before about transition had been replaced by this loss and my thoughts about transition seem to have simply vanished.

At this point in my transition (is it still a transition?) everything for me, being a women that is, is very much normal and almost taken for granted.  I used the word ‘almost’ because I can never take this for granted after all I’ve gone through – what I mean is that daily activity as a woman is not questioned by me nor looked at with this “oh wow – I’ve made it” type of wonderment.  Back in 2013 I wrote a post about wanting to feel ‘nothing‘ – meaning everything is seen, felt and communicated – gender wise – correctly and not with extensive disphoria.  That is where I am today.

There are occasional disphoric moments, for example, seeing a reflection of myself when my hair is blown back and my face seemingly looking too masculine or interpreting a look from someone as evidence I’m not “passing”.  These are rare and for the most part I now walk through life with the assumption that everyone’s first impression of me is as a female.  In other words, I have a confidence now.  In situations where there are people that know that I’m a trans-woman, I have no issue being open and sharing, as long as they respect me ‘as a woman’!  And that is the norm – yayayayay!

The picture I chose above is when I addressed a gathering of over 300 people in remembrance of the shootings in Orlando at an LGBT* nightclub.  This was put together by the Maui Pride organization which I was elected to as a board member.  Just one of the things I’ve been doing since Lisa passed away.  And, a biggie for me, I was accepted into a Womyn’s group.  Another was being inducted into the service organization of the Rotary.  In all of these I am out and known as a trans*woman and accepted as a woman.

13406789_1142060105835549_4511701261095197320_n (1)

Supporting Jaysen as he recites his poem.

I also have the opportunity to help a teenage youth, FtM, gain confidence as he transitions.  I’ve given him a tour of the summit observatories and did some stargazing while we were up there.  It’s so very rewarding to watch him gain confidence in himself and move forward in life.  He was a co-speaker at remembrance for Orlando as well.  As he started to read the poem he wrote especially for this event, he had a hard time getting started – so I went around and came up behind him and placed my had on his shoulder.  That was all he needed and his confidence was back!  He is now engaged in a lot of activities on the Island and is becoming known as the youth spokesperson for Trans*.  This is so awesome.  I’m very proud of him and honored to have been able to be a part.

Both of us were on a radio talk show here on Maui to discuss being trans, some of the misconceptions, and generally more information about trans* to help set the record straight.  It’s an hour long but I think very good.  Suzanne (the host) did a great job of asking the right questions.  At one point even I did mix up the  terms, placing sexual orientation words in a statement I was making about non-binary gender identity.  So embarrassing especially after just talking about sexual orientation is completely different from gender identity!  I know it’s long but please have a listen to the entire recorded show here on my YouTube site.  My mic was quite soft so you might need to turn up the volume to hear what I had to say.

I have been able to do so much and come so far, but all of this has been possible because Lisa had passed away.  I would not have gone out and got involved if Lisa was still alive.  I would have continued as we were, together, in love and always in each others company.  This troubles me a lot and is another source of terrible grief.  I remember Lisa telling me how badly she grieved after her brother died.  Lisa was the estate executor and she would say over and over again how she would rather have him be alive then have part of his estate.  I am now in the same situation, I have accomplished so much in the last 15 months since she passed away.  I would much rather have her alive and the two of us quietly sitting at home, together, enjoying life than everything I’ve accomplished since.  It’s painful.  I knew from the first day after she passed away that I had to get out there and be a part of everything I could:  Maui Pride, Hiking Groups, Maui Adventures, Womyn’s groups, Sunday brunch groups, Rotary and the list goes on.

20160710_191448

Giving a tour and stargazing at the summit of Haleakala

Lisa wanted to retire back to Oregon the second I turned 66 – my full retirement age.  We had even put an offer on a house and had it accepted.  We were waiting for the inspection report before finalizing – and that is when she passed away.  The day she passed away I had to call and cancel that offer.  I have now come full circle – I have just purchased a home on the beach in Oregon – a huge dream of hers (and mine).  I will be retiring there on the 1st of Jan, 2017.  During the first two weeks that I stayed in the new home, I could feel Lisa’s presence in the chair next to me.  I could feel her happiness.  I can’t tell you how happy I am to have felt that and her acceptance of this home.  The irony is, she would not have purchased this when she was alive due to her bad knees, but she would have enjoyed this immensely in our retirement.

Back to transition ….

Once again a caveat … this is meant for those that are following me in transition, others may consider some of what comes next as TMI (too much information).  You have been warned!

Most everything has stabilized.  It is very hard to lose weight and so very easy to gain it.  This is very different from before hormones.  As a result, I’m up about 10 pounds from when I had my surgery.  My breasts have grown perhaps just a little, my aoreolas are more pronounced and I definitely need to either wear a bra or ‘peddles’ to conceal my nipples under a top.  I would also say I have some curves in the right places that I didn’t have before.

I still wear liners.  For one, panties go a lot longer.  I have a slight continuous discharge, not from the vagina but from the upper areas close to the clitoris.  My doctor told me that was normal for a lot of woman and due to estrogen.  This slight wetness keeps everything clean and healthy.  When I shower I don’t use soap there:  I rinse thoroughly with water under the shower, making sure to get into all the folds (after surgery for a number of months I used soap).   At first I had the ‘cheesies’:  deep in some of the folds a yellowish cheesie deposit would form and this did not smell very nice.  Again my doctor found and showed me where and how to clean.  This has not happened for quite a while now.

I still do not like to wear jeans or anything tight down there, but I am able to tolerate that longer now.  However, if I take a long arduous hike, etc., I’ll notice that it will be tender and sometimes sore.  Once my liner had a slightly pink color – so something bleed a little.  That was after a pretty hard long hike in the mountains here.  A few months after my surgery I had what felt like a bowling ball directly under my clitoris – very hard and sore.  It was only after that went away (shrunk and then disappeared) that I was able to sit without using a cushion.  Well, once after a difficult all day hike wearing tight jeans, this came back – maybe only marble size, but in the same place and with the same soreness and tenderness.  It went away withing 24 hours, but I thought that was noteworthy as it was almost the same thing.

And orgasms ….  I have not had any ‘over-the-top’ knock down, blows one’s mind out orgasm (yet).  I will have these mini-orgasms that will peak but will go away quickly.  These are full body and wonderful, but very short and perhaps not so intense.  One of my problems might be that when they happen, my mind kicks in with ‘oh wow’ and then ‘keep going’ – all distracting from the event itself.  Others that have transitioned the same time as me have figured it out and others still have not even had one, just like in the normal female population.  I consider myself fortunate to be able to have this.  Plus I think I’m placing too much pressure and ‘thought’ behind it.  I have to learn how to let go even more.  I really wish I had a partner in times like this ….  I remember how totally awesome it was for Lisa.

I have noticed that I have synchronized with the other women in the office.  For about a week each month, I bloat up only to loss all the water weight all at once over a 16 hour period – using the restroom as often as every 45 mins or so, with a large volume each time.

It’s just before this week that I have any inclination or wish for stimulation (what a huge difference from being a male!!).  I am really grateful for that actually.  As a male, testosterone imparted this almost constant drive that I hated.  As a women, I knew that was not part of me and I hated how that had effected me.  This is another one of the many parts of disphoria – a disconnect between one’s self and one’s body.

Dilation is not a problem at all any more.  I dilate once a week, but there have been times when I missed – and had no problem the next time.  I know others that can not miss a week without having trouble getting to depth or having tightness.  I’m lucky.  There was a discussion within the forums about switching to using a dildo or vibrator of the same width and depth instead of the lucite dilator.  So, well, I bought one!  It certainly makes dilation a lot easier!  But it’s not as rigid as the dilator, so I alternate to make sure I keep the depth and width.

After I had my surgery and the doctor removed the packing, he inserted the dilator and showed me the initial depth – it was 6.5 inches.  However, every time after that when I dilated, I measured 5.5 inches.  Now, in the last couple of months, I have reached the 6.5 inches!  So for me at least, I was able (after almost 2 years) to get back to my original depth.  Not that his matters – I don’t have a partner and even if I do find someone – a new partner would almost certainly be female.  But, as another trans*sister put it – you paid a lot of money/pain/effort for this …

Every now and then I wake up in the middle of the night and adjust the blanket – taking it off a bit because I got too hot only to put it back on later because I got too cold.  For a while I thought this was outside temperature changes (in Maui I have all the windows and the sliding door to the lanai open in my bedroom – Lisa and I both loved the fresh air).  But this was happening too often for this to be that.  It’s night sweats – mini hot flashes.  Cis women that I know that are post-menopausal have said that ya, they never really go away.  Not as intense, but still there.

I’m still having electrolysis.  The only part left is under my chin/neck and that is more than 1/2 way finished.  I do not shave above my jaw line at all any more – I only shave part of my neck.  That is a huge YAYAYAYAYAY!  I can not wait to have this completed.  I have electrolysis twice a week – 2 hours each time.  Since I’m moving to Oregon in Jan. I’m hoping to have this completed by then.

I also had electrolysis to remove the hairs on my back as well.  I didn’t have many, so that went pretty quickly.  Now, I’m having laser on my front and finally getting that under control.  I’ll have electrolysis on anything that is left on my front (just below the bikini line up to the neck).

In my experience, hormones did not have very much of an effect on my back and front hairs.  I had to shave/wax both all along (about twice a week).  However, the hormones did effect the leg and arm hair.  Mine are now much softer and much less.  I shave legs and arms perhaps once every three weeks to a month.  Just under my knee caps is the only place where it’s noticeable.

The heath provider from work just removed Divigel (estrogen – very very critical for me) from their formulations – meaning I no longer pay the $20 co-pay for it but now am charged $75 !!  What an increase!  I want to fight it, but omg what a mess that is.  In 5 months I retire and will get a medicare plan that will cover it.  I could just wait.  But I think I want to fight this – at least for others and those coming after me.  So we’ll see.  This will be difficult as there are so many other things that need to be done before I retire.  Messy ….

Well, there you go – finally got a post out!  I’ve learned not to promise when the next one will come – but I’ll try.  Things seem to be getting better now.

With much aloha,

Sifan

Advertisements

Back in Touch …

sifan-in-snow-by-coos-bay

Snow on the Coast

Oh boy it’s been a long time since I posted and a lot has happened.  I’ll attempt to fill in the gaps and then cover updates to my transition.

In December I moved from Maui to my new home on the Oregon coast.  I’m semi-retired, working remotely from here.  I spent half of December packing up a shipping container and the other half traveling over but also spending time with my family in Minnesota.  The first part of January was spent moving the contents of the container to my home on the coast and then starting the process of unpacking.  My ex-spouse (1st marriage) came over to Maui to help and is staying here for a number of weeks helping me sort through and setup my home here.  She is also giving me moral support in this very difficult time.

big-waves-out-front-window

Big waves take out the living room window

My kealoha Lisa, passed away 22 months ago and I am still in very deep grief.  Leaving Maui was difficult but leaving all the places and memories of the life we have spent together was infinitely more painful.   As they say, severe grief comes in waves – that is very true.  The more intense the love shared – the greater the grief experienced.  The worst thing one can do is try to suppress or try to ‘get over it’.  There is no such thing as getting over it – it’s for the rest of one’s life.  All that can be done is to learn how to live with this new reality.

I’ve eluded to this in past posts, I feel Lisa’s presence strongly.  She has always ‘been there’ for me when I needed her or called to her for help.  One example was when I was out to eat with her brother and his wife.  There were these beautiful flowers on the table, ones that Lisa knew and had on our lanai.  But I couldn’t remember it’s name.  I asked Lisa for help and within seconds the flower’s name came to me.  This has happened many times since.  There are also times when I felt a physical presence, tap on shoulder, bed depressing behind me as she would sit down on the side of the bed, and the list goes on.

I have documented a lot of these and have promised to write a post here about those.  That is yet to come.  Lisa wrote a book on spiritual awakening which is now ready for publishing.  More on that in another post.

I am very fortunate that my ex-spouse and I are on such wonderful terms.  As she puts it, now that I’m a woman, she sees me as one of her best girl friends.  At first she could not understand what had happened to us or during that time how different and changed I was.  At that time – nether did I.  Back then, I did not know that I was beginning the process of peeling back the layers and the woman inside me was struggling to get out as the testosterone in me fought to keep in control.  The result was messy and led to our divorce.  It wasn’t until nearly 4 years later that I even knew what transgender was and that I was one.  My ex-spouse (and myself) were very confused by this change that seemingly came out of nowhere.

When I finally figured out what/who I was, she and many others questioned  this, as they had not seen any signs of this in all my years with them.  Now, most everyone sees my gender in my past years.  My ex now realizes (as did Lisa) that they had fallen in love with me precisely because of my female gender – I was not (as they both have said) a ‘regular’ male – I was more sensitive, caring and ‘not chauvinistic’ like all the other men.

But at that time, when the internal wars began, this was not obvious.  Lisa had terrible trauma when she was a very young child.  This lasted her entire life time and it was only in the last year or so of her life that she was able to recognize this and to understand the great influence this had on her life and the great grief she carried.  Lisa was the first to point out that I too had something deeply buried.  And indeed, I had.

The greater the trauma, the deeper it is buried and the greater the internal protections become in order for one to both cope with similar situations but also to avoid those situations entirely.  In my case that created a powerful male layer that denied my gender in all ways possible, my true identity.  When I was very young, I knew I was a woman.  After this trauma, all that was deeply buried.  That layer then sought out to ‘prove’ in all ways possible, my maleness – like climbing, being a leader, getting married and having children and the list goes on.  Yes, I know that climbing, being a leader, starting a company etc. are not related to gender – however, 50 to 60 years ago – it was.

Being a woman and also being ‘under the influence’ of testosterone led to some very difficult situations in my past years, pre-transition.  But it really started to come to a head in the last years with my ex, before I met Lisa.  It takes a lot to  break a lifetime of testosterone based ‘protection’.  There was so much disphoria: the internal conflict between hormone directed actions and my feminine being.  This is all in hindsight – and was very confusing at that time.

Lisa was awesome in her acceptance of me and in her guidance and help.  She had difficulties with this.  She wrote about this in a previous post.  But despite that, she was a great ally and gave total support.  This is yet another reason I miss her so very much.

Update to my transition:

I was taking Divigel, which is a topological drug – daily I would empty two packets of this gel on my upper legs and rub that in.  The drug plan that I was on, changed their formulary, making this very expense (it went from $17/mo to about $75/mo).  Worse, for medicare plans, this was almost $250/mo!  I talked with my endocrinologist and was changed over to the Estrogen patch instead.  This costs me $11 for three months worth!!  What a difference.  I had blood tests done after I was on the patches for a bit and my levels have stayed about the same.  Even better, I put two patches on, twice a week.  So there is no longer a nightly routine of applying Divigel.  All I do now is change patches on Monday and Thursday.  So much better and easier.  I have yet to find a doctor here – I have 2 months of patches left, so that gives me a little time to find the right doctor.  But having to find someone who is trans* friendly is a bit daunting.

My final doctors visit on Maui turned out great, but sad.  I will miss them a lot.  Those were wonderful people.  I had a thorough exam: she said “wow, you have a good looking vagina”!  Everything ‘down there’ is looking good and in proper order.  Basically at the hormone levels that I’m at, I’m equivalent to a pre-menopausal woman that has had a hysterectomy.  I need to take estrogen for the rest of my life.  If I don’t or if I lapse, I will go into menopause (hot flashes and all) until I get back on and stabilize.  Menopause for the rest of my life is not a good thing…  I had a taste of that before my SRS – I had to go off all medications for a month before.

I still wear liners.  I find that, like many pre-menopausal woman, I have a slight discharge from the upper area.  Wearing liners just keeps things cleaner (and less washing…).  I do ‘get wet’ there when aroused.  From what  I understand from the doctors and research, SRS does not put reconstruct the female glans that allow for those discharges.  However, many of the trans*women that I know, also secret normally during the month but especially if aroused.  I’m happy I’m one of them!

My breasts are perhaps a tab larger than before, so even 3 and 1/2 years after starting estrogen, they are still growing, although just slightly.  Lately they are very firm as well.

And oh yes – once a female, if you put on weight, it is very very difficult to get off.  Even with all this moving and exercise and not eating much (well until the holidays came around) I hardly lost any weight.  Since the holidays, I’ve gained about 6 pounds which I’m now trying to lose.  I have a long way to go to get back to my SRS weight, but that is my goal.

Large hands and feet, broad shoulders, muscular arms etc. do not bother me – no disphoria there.  However, my face is another story.   I’m not sure what to do about it.  I have a high hair line and I wear bangs.  But I have to comb hair from past the middle of the top forward in order to cover it.  When it’s blowing etc, this tends to move the hair of the bangs to one side exposing a very high hairline on the other side.  Having a good trim and style is very important.  Since the move, I have not been able to get one – but I’m scheduled for next week.  I’m hoping that will help with this.

And as for that other very important aspect of being trans* – getting ‘clocked’.  So far nothing obvious has happened.  No one has mis-gendered me.  However, there were some places where I just felt very uneasy.  Whether or not people were looking or mis-gendering me, I had these feelings.  I have learned, now that I have transitioned, to respect these feelings.  So in these situations, I will graciously extract myself.

I just finished writing another post, this one talking about what are we post transition: woman or trans-woman.  Have a look.

Now that I’m starting to settle in this new life, I’m hoping to post here more often.  Mahalo to everyone that is following these posts.

With much Aloha,

Sifan

 

Post transition: Woman or Trans-Woman

transgenderWhen is one finished transitioning?  Or for a more controversial topic – when is one a ‘woman’ and no longer a ‘trans-woman’?  This is a difficult question, one with heated disagreement on both sides of the answer.  First off, for me, I do not consider myself a transgender.  That term is very broad and in my opinion describes persons that are non-binary, somewhere in the middle between man and woman.  I’m a transsexual, someone who ‘is’ binary, just the opposite from the obvious birth characteristics.

There are problems with all of this.  For example, no one is completely a man or a woman, everyone has a bit of both.  Technically there is no binary gender system at all:  everyone is transgender!  Second, the word ‘transsexual’ has a lot of bad connotations to it – mostly because of the word ‘sex’ in it.  However, this is the noun ‘sex’ not the verb – something lost on most people … (eg noun as in what ‘gender’ you are, not verb as in having sex).  Because of this, I’m very hesitant to use that word and will use transgender when I’m discussing this with someone.

For a transsexual then, most of us (but not everyone) are driven to correct our situation (SRS surgery, hormones, etc).  Our goal is to become or actualize our correct gender, which is opposite (binary) from our designated birth ‘sex’.  (I’m very carefully stating this:  I was always a woman, but was ‘designated’ male, by someone ‘else’ when I was born).  None the less, having the wrong external sex characteristics and wrong hormones coursing in my veins caused great internal stress (disphoria).  So for me (and others) it was very important to become or actualize who we really are.

Here’s the dilemma:  as a transsexual, once I am past transition, I’m a woman – that’s what this transition was all about.  At the same time, I’m part of the ‘transgender’ community and today especially, it’s very important to not only stay connected but also to support and further that cause.

That’s the crux of the matter:  a lot of people have very strong opinions both ways:  one is always trans* and once transitioned, one is now fully their target sex (they were always their target gender).

And yes, for the cis-women in the world – I/we will never be that.  I don’t have the same life experiences as you.  However, do not discount that too quickly.  I grew up as a woman inside.  As a result I suffered very similar social injustice and prejudices and as a child suffered severe trauma.  Not the same, but a similar very rocky road.  Additionally, I had many confusing situations where I was either completely misunderstood or could not believe how the other boys/men around me acted.  In other times, I could not believe what my testosterone driven body was doing or feeling – which was completely opposite of what and who I was.  This is disphoria.

For me personally, I’m someplace in the middle.  I am a woman, I have been since before I was born.  I consider myself fully transitioned – I am now a female (sex) woman (gender).  At the same time, I am trans*:  I went through my transition and am here to support and help others.

However, I will not expose or openly declare my trans* status.  It is too risky in this day and age (still) and it can be deadly.  Also, I am a woman and want to fully engage in society as such.  In a trusted environment, in appropriate places, I will engage openly as a trans*woman.

Others are fighters, willing to push the frontiers.  We all need to respect each others limits and capabilities.

With much Aloha,

Sifan

Finality – A Year of Grief and Loss

A good friend of mine had lost her father and we discussed the finality of death and how hard it is to accept along with the grief and deep loss felt.  I thought I would post my reply here because this might help others.

My spouse, the most beautiful love I have ever shared, passed away a little more than a year ago now.  She was with me during my transition and during my operation.  So very supportive.  She passed away about 6 months after that operation.  This last year has been horrific in the pain of the loss and grief felt and accounts for the lack of posts on this blog site.  I know I’ve promised to write more here – enough so that I don’t dare promise anything except that I will try.  There are a lot of things I would like to write and I will.

Here is my response to the feelings of the finality when a person you love dearly passes:

Oh the finality …. I found there are two very distinct parts to that.  I spent 3 hours or so with Lisa’s body in the hospital after she was pronounced dead and before they came to pick her up (oh boy this is difficult to write…).  And then just before she was cremated I viewed her body for about 1/2 hour after which she was brought right to the back and cremated.  It was so hard leaving there, I walked backwards out the building looking at her the entire time until I could not anymore – my last sight of her physical-ness – ever.  Her brother was there with me and came rushing up to support me as I was stumbling and collapsing.

Even though this is so very hard to bring this memory back up – it ‘proved’ beyond a doubt that Lisa had passed – I knew from a visceral level that she was gone – no way to come back.  And that brought closure for me – in a way.
But then, more than a year later, I still grieve so intensely.  There seems to be another part of me that still battles that ‘finality’.  Some other aspect of myself.  From my experience it never goes away, instead I am just learning how to live again, how to get back my sense of purpose and enjoyment of life, but now living alone.  Everything seems ‘just under the surface’ and grief and loss strike at any time – still.  I have found that time helps with coping, but does not diminish the loss or grief and in a way the finality either.  Like you mentioned, we just learn to life like this now.
I do talk to Lisa all the time and in the first person.  I tell her about my day, ask her for help or guidance, etc.  I’m trying to learn how to live with her, together, but in this new ‘state’ of being or relationship.  That does help.
That was my response.  There is so much more about grieving and loss of a loved one to write about.  I will try…
Much Aloha,
Sifan
(much tears)

16 Months (Past One Year) Post Opt (WooooHooo)

Lisa: a beautiful being

Lisa: a beautiful being

In my last post I thought I was ready and able to start writing again, since the loss of my precious beloved Lisa.  I guess I wasn’t all that ready.  This is coming up on nine months since she passed away and the grieving and loss is just as intense as it was then.  I am a bit stronger, I do have times now where I am enjoying life and times where I feel good and feel like I have my feet firmly on the ground and accomplishing things and proud of it.  It is like waves in the ocean (huge ones):  there are times when I’m struggling to get air and being tossed around like being inside a clothes dryer and there are times that I’m peacefully, calmly and confidently floating on top.

I had promised to write two other posts, one on the ways that Lisa has come to me and is present in my life and the other about handling grief and the process that I’m going through.  I have started both of those posts, but have not been able to finish – partly because of the continuing intensity of this grief.  Someone told me that the intensity of grief is a testament to the greatness of the love shared.  I firmly hold that as true.  Lisa and I had an intense love and life together.  It’s the type of love that as a teenager I had dreamed about, the kind one finds only in novels and great plays.  But it happened – it happened to us.  Terms like twin flame and soul mates don’t come close…

Leaving flowers at Lisa's memorial

Leaving flowers at Lisa’s memorial

It is a week to my 16th anniversary (and the day before my anniversary will be 9 months since Lisa passed away ….).  As a result, my 1 year anniversary of my SRS and becoming who I am inside now on the outside, was a pretty hard day with vivid memories of Lisa and I sharing the hospital room and her being constantly by my side plus all the times in Chonburi getting out and around.

Since the last post, I’m now dilating only once a week – I picked Sunday nights.  There were times when I missed a week and didn’t have any issues or problems the next time I dilated.  Some people I know only dilate only once a month.  I might go to that after my 2nd year anniversary but don’t think that would be a good idea right now.

I’ve traveled to the mainland twice this year already and will make another trip in Dec.   I think it’s important to visit Lisa’s and my family more often then we did before, especially after her passing.  During the first trip I held life celebrations for Lisa with everyone and together we scattered some of her ashes in places that were very special to her.  The second trip was just to be together with them, revisit some of these place but also to reminisce and just be together, as a family.  My trip in Dec will be along the same lines.  Although, this will be the first time back in Minnesota during their winter – not sure how smart of an idea this is, but the grand kids have been remembering me and I want to be there more often for them.

On the way to the airport when I was leaving Minneapolis to come home the last time – I got rear ended on the interstate.  I saw my doctor and she prescribed a month’s worth of therapeutic massages, twice a week!  I like this doctor!!  Those are wonderful, so relaxing and has helped my stiff neck and back that I had after the accident.  I have one more to go.  But I think I’ll come back once a month (on my own) from now on.  These really help reduce stress and relax the body.

Lisa and Mazie

Lisa and Mazie

Another major thing that happened is our (Lisa and my) cat Mazie passed away.  Mazie was a very affectionate and loving.  After Lisa passed away, Mazie would cuddle with me in bed and would always be on my lap when I got home.  It’s very interesting that Mazie came to us (appeared at our back lanai) after Lisa’s mother Mazel passed away.  Hence her name – Lisa named her after and in honor of her mother.  And now, Mazie passed away about 2 months after Lisa did.  She was here for Lisa!  This picture of Mazie on Lisa’s lap says it all.

Last week, a good friend of mine decided she is going to move to the mainland and would not be able to bring her cat along and asked me if I would take the cat (named Bella Marie).  Bella is 7 years old, a mix of Tobi and Siamese and is very loving as well.  At first I wasn’t sure I was ready.  Bella knew me from the times I would visit, so everything went exceptionally well when she was came to stay with me.  She is becoming just as affectionate as Mazie was – sitting on my lap and laying at foot of the bed at night, occasionally coming up and cuddling next to me.  And amazingly, she is toilet trained!  She is an indoor cat, so I don’t have the messes I had with Mazie trekking in all the dirt.  Bella is a huge help with my grief and loss of Lisa (and Mazie).  It’s great having her around the house.  Another loving being is now sharing the house with me!

I’m keeping myself busy – maybe a bit too busy.  For a couple of weeks I helped a good friend of mine with her business – spiced cacao.  I helped package, label, count and load everything up for a ‘Made in Maui’ huge event.  That was a lot of fun and met a lot of friends there.  She also took me out to a couple of Rotary outings, one was a Halloween party put on by a well known doctor here – that was awesome.

I’ve also been elected to the board of  Maui Pride.  For me this is a huge honor.  I’ll be helping with their events and planning.  They have monthly hikes, monthly dine outs, special events, etc.  Their largest event, the Maui Pride Fair, raises enough money to be able to hand out a dozen or so scholarships to LGBT students here.  They also help other organization on island with their fundraisers like “Woman helping Woman” and the AIDS foundation.

Through on of their events – a dine out – I met a wonderful couple.  A couple of weeks later I get an invite to their wedding!  It was beautiful.  They are both chefs and you can just imagine the festivities and food afterwords.  Well, last week was a birthday of a mutual friend, I was invited over to their house.  There were five of us women and we had a wonderful time.  It is so great to be accepted by them and to enjoy their company.  Now, I’ve been invited to share Thanksgiving with them.  What an honor!

Ok, on to transition and what’s it’s like for me at 16 months.  Again, so much has been eclipsed by Lisa’s passing, followed by the loss of Mazie our cat and also all three topical fish (basically every living thing in our house except me!).  It was just one thing after another.  Then that was followed by losing a number of precious items, like the ring from Lisa’s finger (that I took off of her in the hospital after she passed away).  So it’s been pretty tough.

It is nice only dilating once a week – that takes off a huge burden.  My breasts have been sore now and then, just like they were when a growth spurt occurred – and they have grown a bit more.  I had one scare however.  I had my first mammogram and they called me back to get an ultrasound.  It turns out I had a swollen lymph node and not to be worried.  However, this does point out how important it is to be checked.

So, a bit of TMI  (too much information) – stop here if you don’t want TMI ….

Everything ‘down below’ has healed well and functioning perfectly.  As a young boy I could never understand my mother when she always told me to clean myself very well down there.  What was there to clean any more then any other part of my body?  Well … things are sure different now and I now understand what she was referring to!  There are so many folds and creases down there that it’s a lot harder to clean.  I’m not sure what they call that white stuff that forms in the creases but it does not smell good.  Twice I asked my doctor and she showed me yet another crease or fold I didn’t know about, where this hid …. I’ve got ’em all now.

Big news is that I had my very first orgasm.  It was a small one, but it was one none the less!  A lot of trans*women have experienced their first orgasm at around 4 or 5 months post opt. But I had urinary problems when I came home from Chonburi and then a urinary infection back home that took months to clear up. A couple of months after that, the love of my life, my spouse Lisa passed away (she is a nurse and was with me in Chonburi for my operation).   I had a dream where Lisa came to me.  She wanted so much to give me my first one.  So, in a way she did.  Just like Lisa, an orgasm’s effects lasts for days after – sort of a glow – just like Lisa always had.  This is just one of many ways Lisa has been showing up – but that is for another post, perhaps another blog site.

So there were lots of factors contributing to not being able to orgasm when others had.  But, it finally happened.  Just wish my beloved Lisa would have physically been here with me ….. miss her so terribly much …

Those who are post opt and have not yet had an orgasm,  you need to be patient – it took me a year. And ‘yes’ to what most others have posted about this – it is different, both physically and mentally.  As a male we were used to ‘forcing’ it, powering through and everything was very focused (mentally and physically).  This is not the case now.  It’s now more about letting go, feeling the entire body, not being focused at all.  Instead being patient, not forcing anything, being open and sensing ‘all’ your feelings.  Here is an accurate but somewhat strange comparison:  for those of you that have had SRS surgery, it’s like the first time you had to urinate (usually they make you do this before you can leave the hospital).  You find out really quick that you can not do it the way you did as a male – you can ‘not’ force it out.  You have be patient, relax, no stress or strain and allow it to flow.  I’m glad I have transitioned.

Well, in the interests of getting this finished and posted, I’m going to finish here.  I can include more details in the next post.  Wishing everyone happy holidays!

With Aloha,

Sifan

10 Months Post-Op

Posted on
Sifan 7/10/2015

Sifan 7/10/2015

I’m not sure what to say, accept that I feel I need to post something.  Today marks 10 months since my SRS and birth into the physical reality of who I am.  Yesterday however, was the 3 month anniversary of when my beloved Lisa passed away.  This post will primarily cover transition.

The entirety of these past three months have been spent in grief, morning and loss.  People say I’m doing better, but it feels even worse than at first.  Nothing in my entire life has been this hard.  This is one of the reasons I could not post until now.  Not sure I’m ready to post now either but I feel I should.

I think I will be creating separate posts to cover the main things I’m going through and experiencing.  Those include the continuing transition (or perhaps it’s post transition now), the grief and loss of my spouse and what I’m going through and what is helping and the many ways that Lisa is showing up and making herself felt.  This last one is quite amazing.  Lisa is being felt by many and I have heard from a lot of people.  This has been an immense relief and comfort to me.

It does not relieve the grief and pain of loss.  After all these years of cuddling every night, all night long – my body experiences this loss so terribly.  But my spirit knows Lisa is with me and I experience her constantly.  These two things continue along at the same time – loss/grief and comfort.

Of course Lisa’s passing has completely eclipsed my transition.  I am very grateful that during this period of memorials, life celebrations and lots of public exposure that no one has ‘clocked’ me, no ‘he’ nor ‘him’ or sideways glances or inappropriate comments or remarks.  Actually I haven’t had anything like that for more than 1/2 a year now.  I’m not sure if that is because of looking more like a woman, acting more like a woman or because of my confidence in being who I am.  I think it’s all in the latter – confidence.  I’m not even thinking about whether I look like a woman or will I be ‘passing’ ok today, etc.   Thanks to my dearest Lisa, I have a confidence now that carries across.

As far as post op recovery is concerned:  wow, they are right – looking back, 6 months was the magical time!  As I stated in an earlier post, it almost happened overnight, the night before my 6 month anniversary.  I no longer used the seat cushion, the remaining pain went away, dilation was much easier, and on and on.

Since then, I have even ridden a bicycle!  Now that was something that the thought of before would send very unpleasant shivers up and down me.

I had a granulation between my labia on my right side that used to bleed now and then back in the months after I got home.  I was very concerned and was going to have my doctor here remove it.  The advice from Chonburi was to just leave it alone.  But I wondered what would become of it:  would it remain as a protrusion?  Would it fall off?  Would it just go back in?  Well now I have the answer – it goes back in.  It’s gone and everything looks good there.

However, my doctor noticed something else – it looked like a ‘Y’ shaped frenulum split my clitoris in half!  Sent off a picture to Chonburi and they said ‘oh oh – that needs a revision’.  Ouch.  The clitoris has ‘legs’ that come down inside the inner labia on a woman.  Apparently those legs are along the inner sides of the inner labia instead of underneath.  These are sensate, but not to the point of pain or it being a problem.  My doctor here said that unless they were effecting me, to not worry about it at all.  She also said to look at it this way:  I have ‘extra’ sensate areas – be glad !!  So, I have a normal clitoris, clitoral hood, frenulum etc., then directly below the frenulum I have these two longish bumps on each side between the upper inner labia that are also as sensate as the clitoris.  I’m happy with that!

For dilation, I’m now down to once every 3 days.  I am on the largest dilator, have been since before the 6 month mark.  I don’t have any problems, no pain and it’s been easy and fast to get to depth.  I will wait for another 2 months (my 1 year anniversary) before I cut down to once a week as recommended for that time and then for the rest of my life.  Trying to figure out what day I’ll do my dilations on when I get to once a week – hummm – Mondays? – nay, those are bad enough ….

I have finally stopped shaving the upper 1/2 of my face!  The electrolysis has progressed far enough along that she now cleans up anything from about midway from my chin to my lower lip and up, then has started on my jaw line and chin and below.  There is nothing to shave above that!  At last – this is soooo good.  However, hair is still growing on my chest and stomach and that is starting to really bother me.  It has slowed down and others have said that it will eventually stop given about 2 years or more of HRT.  But I’m starting to think I might have her do electrolysis there next if this continues.

I’m also having electrolysis on my eye brows and finding that very very helpful.  She applies a topical to numb the area – it’s still a bit more painful than other places but it’s a huge difference in how I look and I don’t have to pluck anymore.  What a relief.

One of the concerns I had recently was how to shave my back.  Lisa used to do that for me – in the hard places to reach, but now ….  Turns out at my doctor’s office they now have waxing and massage.  So I signed up for a waxing for my back, my ears and my nose.  Yes, nose!!  I was pleasantly surprised!  They use a topical to numb the inside of the nose and it really (for me) was not painful at all.  So this will become part of a tri-monthly routine for me now.

My breasts have grown a bit more – I’m a 42B and filling that in pretty solidly now.  I’m glad I did not get breast augmentation when I was in Chonburi – as they had recommended against it and said I would fill out a bit more.  I did and am very happy with what I have.  Mine are ‘on the sides’ a bit, so when I put on a bra I have to pull or tuck them in (and get ‘side’ control bra’s).  This makes them look a lot better as well.  One thing I learned the hard way however – a mosquito bite just under the bra band in the middle of my back is the very worst thing to have!!!  Can’t reach it plus the bra rubs it raw.  ACK !!!!

Finally, my hair is just below my shoulders and slightly wavy along the sides.  I love how it is styled and layered.  Just right.  Ya, I still have high spots on each side of my forehead and therefore have bangs that cover them.  I wish I could use other styles but I do like this one.  I’ve had my hair up and also in a ponytail – always wanted to do that.  I didn’t think I had that much of a ponytail until I caught a reflection in a cornered mirror – wow, it was nice and long – a ‘real’ ponytail at last!  Now if I could just get more hair to cover those high spots ….

I’m settling on a style!  I’m mostly wearing mid to long skirts with tank tops (here in Hawaii) along with cork wedge sandals (1.5 -> 2″) and almost always earrings and a necklace, sometimes a bracelet as well.  I don’t like pants but will wear jeans when I have to (like going to the summit or taking hikes).

Well, here you have it – my first post about transition after Lisa passed away.  Finally, I was able to write.  Hopefully shortly I will write about how Lisa has been showing up to me and others plus a post about grief/loss and coping.

With much aloha,

Sifan

Fullness and Freedom: Re-Embracing Form as the Expression of the Formless

Posted on
Fullness and Freedom: Re-Embracing Form as the Expression of the Formless

This is a great post dealing with awakening and what is sometimes called ‘Zen sickness’. It puts balance back into awareness and life.

Words from the Wind

By Adam J. Pearson

life

Welcome to the Now

What do you experience here and now? If there’s one thing you know beyond all doubt, it’s that right here, right now, you’re aware. A universe of colour, form, sound,  touch, fragrance, and taste is flowing through your consciousness, leaving no traces. Right here, right now, your formless awareness is filled with forms. Colours and shapes and sensations are dancing through this awake space that is aware of them here and now. The screen on which you read these words is glowing. A steady heartbeat thumps in your chest. Without you having to think about it, your chest rises and falls with the incoming and outgoing of your breath. In. Out. In. Out.

As you bring your attention into your inner body, you can feel a tingling sensations in your hands and feet, the aliveness within. You can feel the fabric of your clothes rubbing against your skin when…

View original post 1,666 more words